Biology, Ecology, and Management of Laurel Wilt and the Redbay Ambrosia Beetle

Marc A. Hughes, University of Florida, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Gainesville, FL; Jason A. Smith, University of Florida, School of Forest Resources and Conservation, Gainesville, FL; and David R. Coyle, Southern Regional Extension Forestry and UGA – D. B. Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources

Environmental Management, Forest Health, Forest Management, and Issues

1611_FH-006-V02.pdf — PDF document, 5797Kb

Laurel wilt is a lethal tree disease caused by a fungal pathogen (Raffaelea lauricola), which is a nutritional symbiont of a non-native wood-boring beetle (the redbay ambrosia beetle, Xyleborus glabratus). The laurel wilt pathogen is carried and spread by the redbay ambrosia beetle, and host infections occur when the beetle attacks susceptible host trees. 

 Due to its widespread distribution and the high level of mortality that laurel wilt causes in forests and natural areas, understanding and effectively managing this disease is necessary to maintain the health of southeastern U.S. forests and the plants, animals, and humans that rely on them.

 
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